No Lifeguard On Duty

  Photos by BRADY JONES/Lyman-Richey Corporation   Employees from Lyman-Richey Sand & Gravel and Central Sand and Gravel pull Field Safety Specialist Peyton Connelly out of the water as part of their hands-on water safety training course held at LRSG's Valley, Neb., location.

Photos by BRADY JONES/Lyman-Richey Corporation

Employees from Lyman-Richey Sand & Gravel and Central Sand and Gravel pull Field Safety Specialist Peyton Connelly out of the water as part of their hands-on water safety training course held at LRSG's Valley, Neb., location.

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By Brady Jones
Lyman-Richey Corporation

It was too cold for a nice swim, but it was perfect weather for emergency water safety training at Lyman-Richey Sand & Gravel's pit in Valley, Neb.

“Given the number of water hazards our employees work around on a daily basis, we felt it was important to provide some water safety training," said Eric Nielson, operations manager for Lyman-Richey Sand & Gravel. "Training classes like this not only educate all of us on what to do in a water emergency, but they also bring to our attention tools we should have to make our jobs safer.”

Joe McGuire, CRH environmental manager for the Midwest Region, said Hallett Materials and Cessford Construction companies of Iowa had the first open-water rescue class in 2016. Because it was so well received, they decided to hold refresher classes. When Lyman-Richey Corporation joined CRH, the idea was passed on to our aggregates divisions.

The training was split between a classroom-like portion at the corporate office in the morning and then hands-on practice at the pit in the afternoon.

McGuire said the program informs employees about the hazards of working around water, how cold water affects the body, how to survive in the water, how to escape a submerged vehicle, and how to rescue yourself or coworkers from the water.

"They liked the fact the instructor was able to show this applies to work and home," McGuire said. "I also heard many favorable comments about [Bryan]. They recognized his background as a firefighter, first responder and a rescue and recovery diver made him more credible and engaging."

Bryan Gentner, co-owner and lead instructor for Professional Rescue Innovations, led the October 5 class. He teaches this kind of training with his company parter to sheriff's departments, firefighters, and first responders throughout the Midwest.

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"Several employees said this one one of the best training sessions in which they have ever participated," McGuire said.

Nielson echoed those sentiments and said they will likely schedule additional training in 2019 — once the water warms up.

Brady Jones